Without HUD help, housing options are limited | Local News

When Angela Davey moved to Minnesota in 2002, she was lucky to have a friend with available space. She and her infant daughter moved into their temporary Rose Creek home.

The move from San Francisco was prompted by medical and personal reasons.

“I had a short life expectancy at that time,” Davey said of her chronic health conditions, which come with a terminal diagnosis.

It took the single mother about two months to secure income-based housing in Austin and another six months to receive approval for a federal Housing and Urban Development program. A year later, she used her HUD voucher to find housing in Rochester, so she could be closer to the Mayo Clinic.

Davey, who lives on Social Security and disability, said she’s not sure where she would have ended up if it hadn’t been for the HUD program, sometimes referred to as Section 8. There are programs available for single people with similar health conditions, but keeping her daughter close was important. So was stability.

Dave Dunn, Olmsted County’s housing director, said that’s what the federal program offers.

“The program provides that stability for a family, so they have a place that they can call home and it’s not going to change in three weeks or two months,” he said. “It’s a steady opportunity for someone to call a place home and start to grow roots.”

But Olmsted County is tightening its belt in the face of a HUD program shortfall, which could range from $17,000 to $165,000 locally. Dunn said a call with federal officials this week didn’t shed much new light on the situation.

“They expect a final number in early July,” he said.

To ensure no families are pushed out of the program, the Olmsted County Housing and Redevelopment Authority plans to use homelessness prevention funds to fill any gaps.

However, Dunn said 681 families are still in limbo. They have been on a waiting list since…

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